Travel through El Salvador, Guatemala, Belize and Mexico to experience evocative Central America.

Discover stunning beaches, emerald jungles and historic cities in five countries across Central America on this expansive Latin adventure. Snorkel, swim and snack on lobster in the idyllic Belize Cays and sip a Caribbean cocktail in Playa del Carmen, Mexico. From the ruins of Copan in Honduras to Chichen Itza in Mexico, discover the far-reaching might of the ancient Mayans. Step back in time in colonial Suchitoto, munch on a pepian in Antigua and experience a traditional homestay in San Jorge, Guatemala. Whether you’re cycling through tribal villages in Mexico or blissing out on the black El Salvadorian sands of El Tunco, the colours, rhythms and natural wonders of Central America are sure to bewitch.

Start
El Tunco, El Salvador
Finish
Antigua, Guatemala
Countries
Belize,
El Salvador,
Guatemala,
Honduras,
Mexico
Themes
Explorer
Code
QVSPC
Physical rating
Cultural rating
Ages
Min 15
Group size
Min 1 Max 12
Carbon offset
388kg pp per trip


Highlights

  • Hike through tiny colonial towns along the Ruta de las Flores, El Salvador
  • Explore the ancient Maya site of Copan
  • Feast on delicious treats in Antigua, the cultural capital of Guatemala
  • Chat with friendly English-speaking locals in Belize
  • Kick back on the Caribbean beaches of Playa del Carmen
  • Tour the renowned Maya ruins of Chichen Itza

Itinerary

This itinerary is valid for departures from 01 January 2016 to 31 December 2016. View the itinerary for departures between 01 January 2017 - 31 December 2017

Your adventure begins with a Welcome Meeting at 6pm on Day 1.

Please look for a note in the hotel lobby or ask the hotel reception where it will take place. If you can't arrange a flight that will arrive in time, you may wish to arrive a day early so you're able to attend. We'll be happy to book additional accommodation for you (subject to availability). If you're going to be late, please inform the hotel reception. We'll be collecting your insurance details and next of kin information at this meeting, so please ensure you have all these details to provide to your leader.

The laidback village of El Tunco has become well known for its surf and is the perfect spot to grab a drink, lie back in a hammock and watch the sunset over the black-sand beach.

While this town remains relatively unknown to international travellers, it's a preferred holiday destination for Salvadorians - particularly on weekends.
Take the day to enjoy this relaxed piece of paradise. Hire a board and tackle the waves, sip on a smoothie or visit the beach caves at low tide. In the evening, munch on the local specialty of pupusa and join the locals for a cocktail at the bar.
Today we travel to the town of Ahuachapan.

A mid-sized town near the Guatemalan border, Ahuachapan is known for its geothermal activity, which it uses to produce electricity for the rest of the country. It is also a handy jumping off point for some of the highlights of western El Salvador.
The following day we'll explore the Ruta de las Flores - a 36km-long winding trip through brightly-colored colonial towns famed for lazy weekends of gastronomy and gallery-hopping, as well as more adventurous pursuits like hiking to waterfalls scattered throughout the glorious Cordillera Apaneca. Home to the country’s first coffee plantations, some of its finest indigenous artisans and a world-famous weekend food festival. We'll travel by local bus to explore some of the towns.

In the evening we'll have the option to visit the nearby hot springs for a relaxing dip.
Today we head to the town of Suchitoto in northern El Salvador.

Along the way we'll make several stops to visit the Tazumal Ruins, enjoy spectacular views over Lake Coatepeque and explore the fascinating preserved ruins of Joya de Ceren - known as the Pompeii of the Americas.
Suchitoto is a reminder of El Salvador's past. A beautiful colonial town with painted houses and cobbled streets, it is a world away from modern El Salvador. The town overlooks the Embalse Cerron Grande, also known as Lago Suchitlan, which is a haven for migrating birds, particularly falcons and hawks.
Use this free day however you wish. Those looking to kick things up a gear may fancy a hike in the Cinquera Forest or kayaking on Lago Suchitlan, or perhaps tour the Guazapa Volcano and the Cihuatan Ruins in the valley below.
Today we travel north to Copan, Honduras (approx. 6 hrs), crossing the border into Honduras is expected to be smooth and without complications, your leader will explain the process.

Located close to the Guatemalan border, the town of Copan Ruinas is a major gateway for tourists visiting the Pre-Columbian ruins of Copan.
Take a guided tour of the ancient ruins of Copan - the southernmost of the great Maya sites for which Central America is famed.

This particular site was listed as a World Heritage site in 1980 and is unique because of the 21 stelae or columns that have been found there. These are heavily carved with reliefs depicting the passage of time and the lives of the royal families. There are also a number of small pyramid-shaped temples and excavated vaults. Walk through the grassy plazas under the gaze of huge carved faces, staring out from ancient walls. As you walk past monuments, statues and staircases it's hard not to wonder at the mysterious disappearance of such a creative civilization.
Travel across the border into Guatemala and on to Antigua.
The old colonial capital of Guatemala, Antigua remains the cultural centre of the country. Its cobbled streets, local markets, colonial buildings, and indigenous marimba music emanating from the many bars and restaurants create a fantastic atmosphere.
Go out for a stroll and try tamales, a local dish usually prepared traditionally on weekends and served in a corn leaf. You could also give the pepian a try, a meal that consists of a rich dark sauce and three meats (chicken, beef and pork). The best value food you find is next to the artesian market close to the bus station.
In your free time, perhaps check out the CHOCOMUSEO, located two blocks away from the central plaza. Here you will learn all about chocolate, its history and nutritional values and you may be lucky enough to get a sample bag of chocolates at the end of the tour. Otherwise just grab a coffee from one of the many coffee shops in central park and just sit back relax and enjoy the beauty of this incredible city and the amazing people you will find. If you want to learn more about the famous Guatemalan coffee you can go on a coffee tour, visit the plantations, do some coffee tasting and even buy some to take back home.
As this is a combination trip, your group leader and the composition of your group may change at this location. There will be a group meeting to discuss the next stage of your itinerary and you're welcome to attend, as this is a great chance to meet your new fellow travellers.
As the seat of the Spanish colonial government, Antigua was once the most important city in Central America. In 1773 the city was destroyed by an earthquake but many of the colonial buildings have been carefully restored and the architecture from its glory days can still be admired. Walk through the quiet cobblestone streets past heavy carved-wood entrances. There are many fascinating markets and museums to explore, or if your tastes run to more active adventures hire a mountain bike and ride through the countryside. The views of mountain peaks and deep valleys, covered in lush vegetation are simply beautiful.

Perhaps check out the CHOCOMUSEO located on two blocks away from central park. Here you will learn all about chocolate, its history and nutritional values and you may be lucky enough to get a sample bag of chocolates at the end of the tour. Otherwise just grab a coffee from one of the many coffee shops in central park and just sit back relax and enjoy the beauty of this incredible city and the amazing people you will find. If you want to learn more about the famous Guatemalan coffee you can go on a coffee tour, visit the plantations, do some coffee tasting and even buy some to take back home.

Go out for a stroll and try tamales, a local dish usually prepared traditionally on weekends and served in a corn leaf. You could also give the pepian a try, a meal that consists of a rich dark sauce and three meats (chicken, beef and pork). The best value food you find is next to the artisan market close to the bus station.

As this is a combination trip, your group leader and the composition of your group may change at this location. There will be a group meeting to discuss the next stage of your itinerary and you're welcome to attend, as this is a great chance to meet your new fellow travellers.
This morning we make an early start and travel by private minibus to Rio Dulce (approx 8 hrs).
Take an included boat trip down the river to visit Livingston, a fascinating Garifuna town on the coast.
We continue on to Flores today (approx 4 hours), our jumping off point for exploring the ruins at Tikal. The afternoon is free to explore Flores.
Flores was officially founded by the Spanish in 1700, but had existed in various forms well before. It has long remained isolated with locals relying on subsistence farming of corn and beans and the gathering of chicle from nearby trees to produce gum. Many of the locals still get about in the traditional way, by dug out canoe. Take time to stroll through the cobblestone streets past pastel-coloured buildings, buy local handicrafts or take a dip in Lake Peten Itza.
This morning we rise early and take a guided tour of the ruins of Tikal National Park.
Towering above the jungle of the Tikal National Park, the five granite temples of Tikal are an awesome sight and one of the most magnificent Maya ruins. Hidden in the jungle growth is a maze of smaller structures just waiting to be explored. The energetic can climb to the top of the ruins for spectacular views over the canopy. You may even spot toucans, macaws and other colourful birds.
Following our visit it's time to say goodbye to Guatemala and head across the border to San Ignacio (approx 3 hrs). The journey to the border is on a dirt road, so you really feel like an explorer crossing from one country to another.
Belize is the only English speaking country in Central America, which will make chatting with locals much easier. The Belizeans are known for their relaxed and easy going way of live. You will be amazed how many different cultures coexist harmoniously here.
We have limited time in San Ignacio but you can choose to join one of the optional activities, including the ATM Cave, en route to Belize City on Day 7.
The cave of Actun Tunichil Muknal is a living museum of Mayan relics. Wade through water until you reach the Mayan ceremonial site. Here you will find ceramic pots and crystallised skeletons, preserved by the natural processes of the cave for over 1,400 years.
One of the optional activities here is a day trip to Xunantunich, an impressive Mayan ceremonial centre located with panoramic views over the countryside. The east side of one of the temples has a unique stucco frieze and the central plaza has three carved stelae. Getting to the site is half the fun as you'll need to take a hand-cranked ferry to cross the river.
In the late afternoon and at night, many little street barbecue stalls open, and serve huge portions. Give it a try, sit down next to the road, chat with the locals and enjoy a juicy chicken leg.
All guests at our hotel in San Ignacio are required to pay an additional charge of USD20 per night if they choose to use the air conditioner in their room. Electricity in Belize is incredibly expensive so most hotels charge an extra rate to use the air conditioning - and USD20 per night is pretty standard. We could include this extra charge in the trip price but then all of our travellers would have to pay whether they want to use it or not. We believe giving our travellers the option is a fairer way to manage this situation.
Today we leave San Ignacio in the early morning and head north to Belize City on a local bus (approx 3 hrs). Get ready for stop and go as there are very few official bus stops in Belize and the bus will keep stopping to pick up passengers. Use this to make conversation with the person next to you on the bus; Belizeans love to talk about their country!
Once in Belize City we take a water taxi to Caye Caulker (approx 1 hr).
The Belize Cayes are a group of islands a short boat ride away from the coast. There are a number of these islands to choose from, but we base ourselves on Caye Caulker as this is one of the more popular islands with travellers. From here it is possible to arrange day trips to other cayes, to the best reefs for snorkelling, or simply to take a local boat out to the reef of Caulker itself. Each island has its own particular character, but all of them have the unmistakeable Caribbean pace and charm.
Relax on the beach or head out to Hol Chan Marine Reserve, home to Shark Ray Alley and the world's second longest barrier reef. Snorkel among the colorful corals and see tropical fish, sharks and manta rays. You could also choose to go manatee spotting. These huge peaceful creatures are often called sea cows and are quite curious to meet their visitors.
If you're interested in sampling local cuisine, Caye Caulker is famous for its lobster. Not the cheapest meal you'll ever buy, but so good. Always make sure that you respect the season: the lobsters can only be caught between June 15th and February 15th. Some of the best meals on the island are cooked on the road side. How about some grilled shrimp and a lovely rum and coke made with the local fire water?
Very early this morning (about 6.30am) we head back to Belize City by water taxi, and travel by bus to the border with Mexico (approx. 4 hrs). After crossing the border we head to the Mexican town of Chetumal where we swap buses and head to our final destination: Tulum (approx. 3 hrs).
Tulum is a beach paradise on the Caribbean coast. Spend your time relaxing on the beach or strolling along the white sands. In the evenings kick back and watch the waves with a margarita. For a taste of Mayan architecture take an optional visit of the ruins of Tulum. These ruins sit atop a cliff amid palm fringed beaches and white sand beaches. You can even go for a swim within its ancient walls.
The last leg of our journey is a short one after all this travelling. We hop on a local Mexican bus that will take us to Playa del Carmen (approx. 1.5 hours).
With azure waters, powdery beaches and a European feel, Playa del Carmen is a resort city close to Cancun but without the party atmosphere.
Enjoy a free day in this beautiful location. Spend your time snorkelling among the mangroves, diving in underground caverns or strolling along the white sands. In the evenings kick back and watch the waves with a margarita. For adventures further afield take a ferry across the turquoise seas to Cozumel, an island famous for its coral reef.
As this is a combination trip, your group leader and the composition of your group may change at this location. There will be a group meeting to discuss the next stage of your itinerary and you're welcome to attend, as this is a great chance to meet your new fellow travellers.
Today we will hop on a local bus at about 8am, heading towards the ruins of Chichen Itza (approx. 3 hours) This bus is rather fun because you cruise through little villages seeing the Mexican life outside the city of Cancun. For snacks you can try the vendors that come into the buses selling sweets, sandwiches, tacos and all that good stuff. We have about 2-3 hours to spend at Chichen Itza before we travel onwards.
One of the most impressive Mayan sites, Chichen Itza contains both Toltec and Mayan ruins lying alongside each other. The famous El Castillo pyramid dominates the ruins and the site also has the largest ball court where games used to be held. The games are depicted in carvings on the walls. Nearby, excavations of the Well of Sacrifice offered up treasures of jade, copper and gold as well as many human and animal bones.
After a tour with a local guide we travel on to Merida (approx. 2 hours) where we will spend the night. Your tour leader will take you to the centre of town and show you some of the main sites of this beautiful city.
Founded in 1542, Merida still retains much of its old-world charm with a well-preserved Old Town, wonderful museums and city streets alive with art and culture. Hang out in the green and shady Plaza Grande, with the twin-towered 16th century Cathedral on one side and City Hall, State Government Palace and Casa Mantejo on the others. For a taste of Merida's 19th century glory go for a walk along the mansion lined Paseo de Montejo. Mornings are the best time to visit the outdoor markets and you can stock up on hammocks and Maya replicas. It's a great place to try out the local food specialities, like cochinita pibil or the head-blowingly spicy El Yucateco hot sauce.
Merida is also the gateway to the Maya ruins of Uxmal and there is an opportunity to visit these impressive ruins. Little is known about the site's origins but it is thought the city was founded around AD500. Much of the site is decorated with masks of the rain god Chac. This is no great surprise as the area has a lack of natural water supplies and the city relied on rain water.
Today we have an early start and we jump on one of the very comfortable first or second class buses in Mexico. These buses are equipped with TVs and bathrooms, just what you need for a long bus ride to Palenque. You will leave the Yucatan and travel into the state of Chiapas in southern Mexico (approx. 10 hours). Along the way the bus will stop a few times to give us time to stretch our legs and buy some food and drinks. Once we arrive in Palenque it is a short walk to the hotel.
Today we will hit the ruins with a local guide in Palenque to give you all the information that you need on these mystical ruins.
Palenque is situated on a hilltop in an area of hot jungle and is home to possibly the most impressive series of Mayan ruins, which date back at AD600. Whilst walking amongst the ruins it is often possible to hear the eerie calls of howler monkeys echoing from the jungle, giving an added dimension to this magnificent site. The temples are superb relics of Mayan culture and there are many ruins here still un-excavated and hidden in the surrounding forest.
After breakfast we take another bus to the city of San Cristobal de las Casas (approx. 5 hours).
The local Zapatista movement in the region around Palenque has been quite active in recent months, occasionally holding protests or blocking roads. Our local operations team is constantly monitoring this situation to ensure the safety of our passengers and leaders. In some cases we might need to use an alternative route from Palenque to San Cristobal to avoid this activity - more so to bypass long traffic delays than any real danger.
With winding cobblestone streets and colonial Spanish architecture, San Cristobal de las Casas maintains a lovely old-world feel mixed with strong indigenous roots. The surrounding villages are populated with Tzotzil and Tzeltal Indians who maintain their tribal origins through their varied traditional costumes and customs. There is time here to explore the villages, perhaps by mountain bike. If you take a day trip to San Juan Chamula, make sure to visit the church. The floor is covered with pine needles and the air is heavy with incense. Shamans come here to carry out cleansings with firewater, ancient prayer and sometimes chickens. There are also markets with colourful handicrafts for sale. Take the opportunity to go for an optional day trip to Sumidero Canyon. Back in town, go for a stroll and try to spot the cafe with the most locals in it for a taste of the traditional 'elote', a corn cob which makes a common snack in the highlands of Chiapas.
From San Cristobal we head down to Guatemala by van. It takes about 4 hours to get to the Guatemalan boarder and another 6 hours to get to our final destination, Panajachel. The border crossing is fairly easy, just make sure you have your passport ready and the tour leader will give you detailed instructions on what to do once at the border.
Panajachel, located on beautiful Lake Atitlan with distant volcanoes looming in the background, has a thriving market, good eateries and many water-based activities to enjoy. Go for a swim, hike or kayak on the lake. The surrounding area is dotted with villages which can be reached on foot or by boat. Watch women weaving at Santa Catarina Palopo or explore the colourful markets of Santiago Atitlan, In each village the local life has changed little over the last few hundred years. Each village has its own typical dress and make all the textiles themselves in designs passed down through generations.
Today we move to San Jorge (approx. 10 minutes from Pana) where you will be introduced to your host family and the group may be split in twos or threes depending on the group size.
Locals in San Jorge are both very friendly and very shy. In order to make the most of this experience, it may take a bit of effort from your side to break the ice first. Learn as many Spanish words as you can and get ready for some serious sign language action. Houses in San Jorge are very basic. Your room may only consist of a couple of beds with clean bedding; the bathroom will most likely be outside your room and be shared with the rest of the family. The mother of the family will cook dinner and breakfast for you. Meals can be very basic but filling, consisting of corn, rice and beans. You may want to stock up on some snacks beforehand.
Today we head towards Antigua (approx. 2.5 hours) - our final stop in the Guatemalan Highlands.
The old colonial capital of Guatemala, Antigua remains the cultural centre of the country. Its cobbled streets, local markets, colonial buildings, and indigenous marimba music emanating from the many bars and restaurants create a fantastic atmosphere.
If you're into salsa dancing or you'd like to learn some moves, Antigua is the place to be. Many dancing schools offer hourly lessons that give you the preparation to hit the discos at night and show your moves.
There are no activities planned for the final day and you are able to depart the accommodation at any time.
If you have time, on the last day perhaps consider taking an optional day trip to Chichicastenango to see the famous market.
The town of Chichicastenango lies about 2,200 metres above sea level and features the best of handicrafts from all over Guatemala. This market is a big magnet for national and international travellers. Make sure you also go to visit the local fruit and vegetable market.
There are no activities planned for the final day and you are able to depart the accommodation at any time.
If you have time, on the last day perhaps consider taking an optional day trip to Chichicastenango to see the famous market.
The town of Chichicastenango lies about 2,200 metres above sea level and features the best of handicrafts from all over Guatemala. This market is a big magnet for national and international travellers. Make sure you also go to visit the local fruit and vegetable market.

Unfortunately, more than half the population of this beautiful Guatemala you have come to know so well lives under the poverty line, which may explain why Guatemala has also the lowest literacy rate in Central America. With this in mind, the Intrepid Foundation is proud supporter of CasaSito, an outstanding not for profit organization dedicated to assist youth to reach their academic, personal and professional potential.

If you have 2’ to spare (2’41’’ to be exact!) take a look at this short video about CasaSito – it’s inspiring: https://youtu.be/v62Ou9czWyE

If you want to help CasaSito and Guatemalan’s youth, you can donate through the Intrepid Foundation, which means that your donation will be match dollar for dollar by Intrepid too. No donation is too small. $5, $10, $50 it all goes a long way to help this fantastic organization. Simply visit our website: www.theintrepidfoundation.org/projects/casasito/
View trip notes to read full itinerary

Inclusions

Meals
1 breakfast, 1 dinner
Transport
Private minibus, Local bus, Boat
Accommodation
Hotel (32 nights), Homestay (1 night)
Included activities
  • Day trip along Ruta de las Flores
  • Tazumal Ruins
  • Joya de Ceren archaeological site
  • Guided tour of Tikal ruins
  • Guided tour of Chichen Itza ruins
  • Palenque - Archaeological site guided tour
  • San Jorge homestay

Dates

There are currently no departures for this trip.

{{departure_day.departure_date | date:'EEE d MMMM yyyy'}} {{departure_day.arrival_date | date:'EEE d MMMM yyyy'}}

Style: {{departure.style}}

Boat/Ship: {{departure.vehicle_name}}
On sale Hot deal Departure guaranteed On request
{{product.currency_code}} {{room.base_price | noFractionCurrency:product.currency_symbol}}
{{product.currency_code}} {{room.discount_price | noFractionCurrency:product.currency_symbol}}
Fully booked Bookings closed

Total price per person {{room.room_type | lowercase}}
Includes {{departure.kitty_currency_code}} {{departure.kitty | noFractionCurrency:departure.kitty_currency_symbol}} kitty
Includes {{extra.extras_code}} {{extra.extras_symbol}}{{extra.extras_value}} in local payments Single supplement available from {{product.currency_code}} {{departure.single_supp | noFractionCurrency:product.currency_symbol}}

Contact us to arrange an alternative departure for you

Book {{departure.places_left}} spaces left! space left!

If you can’t find the dates you’re after here, click on the button below to find options for the next season. Please bear in mind that some of our itineraries can change from year to year, so this trip may differ slightly next season to the information shown on this page.

Next Season Dates

Important notes

The itinerary of this trip was updated on 11 April, 2016. The current itinerary is different to what is advertised in the 2016 brochure.

A single supplement is available on this trip.

Trip notes

Want an in-depth insight into this trip? Your trip notes provide a detailed itinerary, visa info, how to get to your hotel, what’s included - pretty much everything you need to know about this adventure and more.

View trip notes