Macedonia

Craggy mountain backdrops, time-weathered monasteries, stunning lake panoramas, hearty national cuisine – Macedonia has only one missing ingredient from the standard Europe recipe. And happily, that happens to be crowds. Landlocked into relative obscurity in a region worshipped for its coast, Macedonia’s tract of the Balkans is often overlooked. Yet for those looking to venture beyond the Adriatic and Aegean, Macedonia’s rugged interior contains rewards aplenty. Excellent hiking can be had in the mountain forests, Lake Ohrid’s waters rival the clarity of Croatia’s and 500 years of Ottoman rule can be acutely felt in the capital’s bazaars. And to round it all out, the locals will be delighted to have you.

Macedonia Tours & Travel

All our Macedonia trips

Dubrovnik to Istanbul

29 days from
USD $5,725
CAD $5,895
AUD $5,790
EUR €3,985
GBP £3,345
NZD $6,450
ZAR R57,960
CHF FR4,825

Travel from Croatia through Montenegro, Albania, Macedonia and Greece to finish in Turkey. Explore fabulous European...

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Dubrovnik to Athens

15 days from
USD $3,095
CAD $3,190
AUD $3,130
EUR €2,155
GBP £1,795
NZD $3,495
ZAR R31,330
CHF FR2,595

Explore highlights and hidden treasures while travelling through Albania, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro and Greece...

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Dubrovnik to Santorini

22 days from
USD $4,625
CAD $4,775
AUD $4,680
EUR €3,220
GBP £2,695
NZD $5,195
ZAR R46,850
CHF FR3,895

Witness the jewels of the Mediterranean, from Dubrovnik to Santorini. Explore the old towns of Montenegro, Croatia’s...

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Articles on Macedonia

What’s happening in Cuba and what does it really mean for travellers?

Posted on Fri, 19 Dec 2014

A “new chapter” in Cuba-US relations was rung in yesterday by media outlets the world over, with President Obama stating: ““We are choosing to cut loose the anchor of the past, because it is entirely necessary to reach a better future – for our national interests, for the American people, and for the Cuban people.”

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South America: the best place to see out your 2015 resolutions

Posted on Thu, 18 Dec 2014

Prone to losing your resolutions mojo by January 2? We've got you covered.

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Helping South America build a brighter future

Posted on Thu, 18 Dec 2014

South America is a beautiful destination, candid and colourful, but many South American countries are still working towards economic stability and equality.

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Five reasons Chile is South America’s unsung hero

Posted on Thu, 18 Dec 2014

If you could trace a beaten track through South America, there’s a good chance you won’t find the wilds of Chile anywhere near it.

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About Macedonia

At a glance

Trips Available: 0
Capital city: Skopje
Population: 2 million
Language: Macedonian
Currency: MKD
Time zone: (GMT+01:00) Sarajevo, Skopje, Warsaw, Zagreb
Electricity: Type C (European 2-pin) Type F (German 2-pin, side clip earth)
Dialing code: +389

Best time to visit Macedonia

Macedonia has a climate somewhere between a transitional continental and Mediterranean climate, which can vary greatly between seasons and regions. The country’s mountainous areas can be subjected to brutally cold winters (December to February), while the lower lying areas can reach 40° C during summer (June to September). Between May and September is the best time to visit, unless you’re into skiing.

History and government

Early History

Even by Balkan standards, Macedonia’s history is characterised by complexity and controversy. Going back to the days of Alexander the Great (the country’s favourite son), Macedonia has been pin-balled between external powers, from the Romans to the Byzantines, the Serbs to the Ottoman Turks, the Bulgarians to the Greeks. In fact, it wasn’t until 1991 that the country officially attained its status as an independent nation – and even that remains a point of contention in certain circles.

From the sixth century AD until the fourteenth, the territory was wrestled to-and-fro between the Byzantines, Slavs, Bulgars and Serbs before eventually falling to the Ottoman Empire in 1371. The country remained under Turkish rule until the empire’s decline in the eighteenth century, then was once again split up but this time between Greece, Bulgaria and Serbia. Various pushes for independence and ‘reunion’ with Bulgaria were then stymied by the two World Wars and the advent of communism.

Recent History

At the conclusion of World War II, the country was incorporated into the Socialist Republic of Yugoslavia under the leadership of Tito – an era during which, by and large, the territory prospered. With the collapse of European communism, however, came new calls for Macedonian independence, and the state peacefully ceded from the republic in 1992.

Wary of ‘Macedonia’ being used as the country’s proposed name due to implied claims to Aegean Macedonia, Greece made its objections known and the compromise ‘The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia’ was eventually arrived at. Greek ire was re-aroused in 1994, culminating in its enforcement of an economic embargo that was eventually lifted upon Macedonia’s changing of its flag and agreeing to discussions about its name. The country evaded being embroiled in the Yugoslav Wars of the 1990s, but experienced a potentially catastrophic civil conflict from 1997-2001 over tensions with its sizeable Albanian population. Hostilities were becalmed with a NATO ceasefire, but the Albanian-Macedonian relationship is still a touchy subject that’s best avoided. The same goes for Macedonian-Greek relations due to the still unresolved ‘naming issue’. And also Macedonian-Bulgarian relations for that matter.

Top Picks

Top 5 Macedonian Festivals

1. The Galičnik Wedding Festival

Back in the good old days, the villagers of Galičnik had only one day each year where Macedonian couples could get married: 12th July. These days, starry-eyed lovers can take their vows on whichever day they please, but for one lucky couple a traditional wedding ceremony is still a possibility. Held on the weekend closest to the 12th July, the Galičnik Wedding Festival commemorates the custom with dances, elaborate dress and a horse bridle being placed on the bride as a test of her obedience. Any Macedonian couple that has already been married in a civil service can apply for the role of official couple, with the winning entrant generally being the one with the prettiest bride.

2. Tikveski Grozdober (Grape Carnival)

Each September, Kavadarci, a small town in Macedonia’s seriously scenic wine-growing region, plays host to the Tikveški Grozdober festival. A celebration of both the town’s liberation and the beginning of the grape harvest, the festival swells with food stalls and music concerts and culminates in an extravagantly costumed carnival procession through the town’s main streets. Oh, and much wine drinking.

3. Ilinden National Festival of Song and Dance

The oldest folk festival in the country, the Ilinden Days, is a celebration of all the folk cultural edifices that have come to represent Macedonian identity over the years. Folk songs and dancing take centre stage here, all performed in traditional garb with traditional instruments. Held over four days, it provides a fascinating insight into traditional Macedonian culture, as well as serving to preserve its history.

4. Pivo Fest Prilep Beer Fest

Macedonia’s breweries aren’t as prolific as its wineries, but beer is still a pretty big player in national culture and deemed worthy a festival. The first Pivo Fest Prilep was held in 2003 and, in contrast to many of the country’s other tradition-orientated festivals, the focus here is on live music, grilled meats, skimpy attire and ales abundant. Perhaps unsurprisingly, it’s now one of the most popular summer events in the country.

5. Carnival Procka

Kicking off three days before the Easter fast begins, the Procka Carnival, which is also held in Prilep, is a celebration of the unconditional forgiveness demonstrated by Jesus for his fellow humans. During this brief holiday, the young ask for forgiveness from their elders, who reply by saying ‘you are forgiven from me and from God.’ If this all sounds a bit sombre (not to mention presumptuous), there’s also great feasting opportunities in preparation for the fasting ahead and things are livened up with parades of highly decorative ‘anything goes’ costumes.

FAQs on Macedonia

Tipping is not customary in Macedonia, but a 10-15% tip at a nice restaurant will be very much appreciated. Some top-end restaurants may include a service charge, in which case there is no need to tip additionally unless the service has really been excellent.
Internet access exists in the major towns and connections are generally very good.
Roaming agreements are in place with most of the major international phone companies, and coverage is generally pretty good.
Turkish-style squat toilets are the standard in Macedonia, even in upmarket establishments. Be sure to carry some spare toilet paper with you, as this won’t always be supplied.
0.5 litre domestic beer = 75 MKD
Cappuccino in a coffee = 75 MKD
Meal at an inexpensive restaurant = 200 MKD
Three-course meal for two at an expensive restaurant = 1,000 MKD
Macedonia’s tap water is safe to drink, so stave off buying bottled water for the landfill it produces.
As a general rule, credit cards are really only accepted at upmarket restaurants and hotels.
ATMs can be readily found in major towns and tourist centres.
Absolutely. All passengers travelling with Intrepid are required to purchase travel insurance before the start of their trip. Your travel insurance details will be recorded by your leader on the first day of the trip. Due to the varying nature, availability and cost of health care around the world, travel insurance is very much an essential and necessary part of every journey.

For more information on insurance, please go to: [site:intrepid_insurance_link]
Jan 1 New Year’s Day
Jan 7 Orthodox Christmas Day
Mar 8 International Women’s Day
Apr 21 Orthodox Easter Monday
May 1 Labour Day
Aug 2 Ilinden (Republic Day)
Sep 8 Independence Day

Please note these dates are for 2014. For a current list of public holidays go to: http://www.worldtravelguide.net/macedonia/public-holidays

Health and Safety

Intrepid takes the health and safety of its travellers seriously, and takes every measure to ensure that trips are safe, fun and enjoyable for everyone. We recommend that all travellers check with their government or national travel advisory organisation for the latest information before departure:

From Australia?

Go to: http://www.smartraveller.gov.au/

From New Zealand?

Go to: http://www.safetravel.govt.nz/

From Canada?

Go to: http://www.voyage.gc.ca/

From US?

Go to: http://travel.state.gov/

From UK?

Go to: http://www.fco.gov.uk/en/

The World Health Organisation

also provides useful health information:
Go to: http://www.who.int/en/

Responsible Travel

Macedonia Travel Tips

Intrepid is committed to travelling in a way that is respectful of local people, their culture, local economies and the environment. It's important to remember that what may be acceptable behaviour, dress and language in your own country, may not be appropriate in another. Please keep this in mind while travelling.

Top responsible travel tips for Macedonia

1. Be considerate of Macedonia’s customs, traditions, religion and culture. Avoid expressing opinions about the country’s relations with Greece, Bulgaria or its significant Albanian population.

2. Dress modestly and respectfully when entering places of worship. Shoulders to knees should be covered and shoes removed.

3. For environmental reasons, try to avoid buying bottled water. Fill a reusable water bottle or canteen with filtered water.

4. Always dispose of litter thoughtfully, including cigarette butts.

5. Learn some local language and don't be afraid to use it - simple greetings will help break the ice.

6. Shop for locally made products. Supporting local artisans helps keep traditional crafts alive and supports the local community.

7. Refrain from supporting businesses that exploit or abuse endangered animals.

8. Please ask and receive permission before taking photos of people, including children.

Further reading

Recommended reading

Title Author
Black Lamb and Grey Falcon Rebecca West
The Golden Mean Annabel Lyon
Hidden Macedonia Christopher Deliso
MacedoniaHarvey Parker and Heather Roberson