Less affluent than many of its oil-rich and decidedly showy neighbours, Oman’s modern development has been comparatively slow-paced with a laidback affability the country’s pay-off.

Crumbling Portuguese forts and tranquil fishing villages line the coast’s secluded shorelines, magnificent desert dunes and oases mottle the interior and traditionally garbed Bedouins can be spied drifting through the spice-filled souqs. Best of all, with their chunk of the Arabian Gulf having long served as a stopover point to centuries of merchant traders and explorers, the Omanis make for consummate hosts, ever keen to show off their country’s wares.

Our Oman trips

Articles on Oman

Oman holiday information

At a glance

Best time to visit Oman

History and government

Top 5 Omani Souvenirs

Health and Safety

Further reading

Oman travel FAQs

Many restaurants will add a service charge, though tipping beyond that is rarely expected. For exceptional service however, a 5% gratuity will be favourably received.

Major Omani cities tend to have a handful of internet cafes, and Wi-Fi is becoming available in many cafes and public places.

Mobile roaming connections are in place with many international phone companies, though coverage isn’t all that reliable in rural areas.

Squat toilets are the norm throughout Oman, though Western-style toilets can often also be found in shopping centres, hotels and restaurants. Toilet paper is rarely provided, however, so keep your own supply handy. Hand sanitiser is also a good idea, as soap won’t always be at the sink.

Can of coke = USD 0.50
Cappuccino = USD 3.50
Meal at an inexpensive restaurant = USD 4
Meal for two at a mid-range restaurant = USD 23

The tap water in Oman (desalinated) is considered safe to drink, though bottled water is safer. If you don’t like the idea of drinking the tap water, we’d advise bringing water purification tablets or asking your leader where filtered water can be found so as to cut down on unnecessary landfill.

The major credit card brands are commonly accepted in substantial hotels and restaurants.

ATMs are plentiful in Oman and most are connected to the big international brands.

Absolutely. All passengers travelling with Intrepid are required to purchase travel insurance before the start of their trip. Your travel insurance details will be recorded by your leader on the first day of the trip. Due to the varying nature, availability and cost of health care around the world, travel insurance is very much an essential and necessary part of every journey.

For more information on insurance, please go to: Travel Insurance

  • 24 Apr The Prophet's Ascension
  • 25 Jun Eid al Fitri Holiday
  • 26 Jun Eid al Fitri Holiday
  • 27 Jun Eid al Fitri Holiday
  • 28 Jun Eid al Fitri Holiday
  • 23 Jul Renaissance Day
  • 1 Sep Feast of Sacrifice
  • 2 Sep Feast of Sacrifice
  • 3 Sep Feast of Sacrifice
  • 4 Sep Feast of Sacrifice
  • 21 Sep Islamic New Year
  • 18 Nov Oman National Day
  • 30 Nov The Prophet's Birthday

Please note these dates are for 2017. For a current list of public holidays in Oman go to: http://www.worldtravelguide.net/oman/public-holidays

Responsible Travel

Intrepid is committed to travelling in a way that is respectful of local people, their culture, local economies and the environment. It's important to remember that what may be acceptable behaviour, dress and language in your own country, may not be appropriate in another. Please keep this in mind while travelling.

Responsible travel in Oman

Top responsible travel tips for Oman

1. Be considerate of Omani customs, traditions, religion and culture.

2. Dress modestly and respectfully. Shoulders to knees should be covered and shoes removed when entering places of worship.

3. Be conservative in engagements with members of the opposite sex. Even fleeting glances or interactions can be interpreted as bearing flirtatious overtones. Needless to say, public displays of affection are very much frowned upon.

4. Always use the right hand in passing, giving and receiving objects. The left hand is used for bathroom tasks.

5. For environmental reasons, try to avoid buying bottled water. Fill a reusable water bottle or canteen with filtered water.

6. Always dispose of litter thoughtfully, including cigarette butts.

7. When bargaining at markets, stay calm, be reasonable and keep a smile on your face. It's meant to be fun!

8. Learn some local language and don't be afraid to use it - simple greetings will help break the ice.

9. Shop for locally made products. Supporting local artisans helps keep traditional crafts alive and supports the local community.

10. Refrain from supporting businesses that exploit or abuse endangered animals.

11. Please ask and receive permission before taking photos of people, including children.

12. When on community visits or homestays, refrain from giving gifts or money to locals.