Leave it to the Danes to invent hygge. It’s basically the national emoticon: a feeling of community, closeness, camaraderie and contentment all wrapped up in one ergonomically designed package.

Of course it’s easy to be content when your country consistently tops liveability rankings, produces addictive crime dramas and is full of green fields, forget-me-nots and windmills. Yep, Denmark just seems to work. Design is minimal, politics is open, pedestrians and cyclists rule the streets and locals walk around looking tall and unfairly attractive. Come for the old-world charm, stay for the new-world outlook.

Our Denmark trips

Articles on Denmark

Denmark travel highlights

Denmark holiday information

At a glance

Best time to visit Denmark

Geography and environment

Top 5 reasons to move to Denmark

Health and Safety

Further Reading

Denmark travel FAQs

Tipping in Denmark is not required (although it may be appreciated). Most restaurants include a service charge in the price of your meal, and many service industries are paid very well, so they don’t rely on tips.

Internet and Wi-Fi are easily available in Denmark, particularly in the major cities. Many cafes and bars will have Wi-Fi access, and internet cafes are common (if a little hard to find in some cases – just ask your concierge). The easiest way to get online is the public library, there’s one in every town.

Denmark has great mobile coverage, so reception shouldn’t be a problem. To avoid roaming charges and international rates, consider picking up a pre-paid SIM card – you can find them at most convenience stores.

Toilet facilities are what you’d expect in any developed Western country – flush toilets are standard.

Beer: 6 USD
Coffee: 5 USD
Simple lunch at a cafe: 15 USD
Dinner for two in a restaurant: 75 USD
Train ticket: 3 USD
Bottle of water: 1.5 USD

Denmark is one of the few places in the world where the regulations on the quality of tap water even exceed those for bottled water. As such, tap water is completely safe.

Major outlets and stores will accept international cards like Visa, Mastercard and AMEX, but some will only accept the local Dankort card. Nearly everywhere will require a PIN code, so make sure to check yours with your bank if you’re unsure. It’s also worth remembering that a lot of retailers will charge an extra 3-4% if you use a foreign credit card, often without warning.

ATMs are widely available in cities and towns (even the smaller ones), but may be closed at night for safety reasons. The term ‘ATM’ is not well known in Denmark, so if you’re looking for one ask for a ‘hæve-automat’.

Absolutely. All passengers travelling with Intrepid are required to purchase travel insurance before the start of your trip. Your travel insurance details will be recorded by your leader on the first day of the trip. Due to the varying nature, availability and cost of health care around the world, travel insurance is very much an essential and necessary part of every journey.

For more information on insurance, please go to:Travel Insurance

  • 1 Jan New Year's Day
  • 13 Apr Maundy Thursday
  • 14 Apr Good Friday
  • 16 Apr Easter Sunday
  • 17 Apr Easter Monday
  • 12 May Prayer Day
  • 25 May Ascension Day
  • 4 Jun Whit Sunday
  • 5 Jun Whit Monday
  • 5 Jun Constitution Day
  • 24 Dec Christmas Eve
  • 25 Dec Christmas Day
  • 26 Dec 2nd Day of Christmas

Please note these dates are for 2017. For a current list of public holidays in Denmark go to: http://www.worldtravelguide.net/denmark/public-holidays

Responsible Travel

Intrepid is committed to travelling in a way that is respectful of local people, their culture, local economies and the environment. It's important to remember that what may be acceptable behaviour, dress and language in your own country, may not be appropriate in another. Please keep this in mind while travelling.

A traveller takes in the river in Copenhagen, Denmark

Top responsible travel tips for Denmark

1. Be considerate of Denmark’s customs, traditions, religion and culture.

2. For environmental reasons, try to avoid buying bottled water. Fill a reusable water bottle or canteen with filtered water instead.

3. Always dispose of litter thoughtfully, including cigarette butts.

4. Make an effort to learn some Danish before you go. Locals will appreciate the effort

5. Shop for locally made products. Supporting local artisans helps keep traditional crafts alive.

6. Refrain from supporting businesses that exploit or abuse endangered animals.

7. Please ask and receive permission before taking photos of people, especially children.