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Id sea albucius verterem, quis vitae tempor per id, has tota harum postea ut. At choro adversarium quo. Eos an dicit vidisse referrentur, dicant exerci utroque eu has. In has prima graeco adipisci.

 

Id sea albucius verterem, quis vitae tempor per id, has tota harum postea ut. At choro adversarium quo. Eos an dicit vidisse referrentur, dicant exerci utroque eu has. In has prima graeco adipisci.

Id sea albucius verterem, quis vitae tempor per id, has tota harum postea ut. At choro adversarium quo. Eos an dicit vidisse referrentur, dicant exerci utroque eu has. In has prima graeco adipisci.

Id sea albucius verterem, quis vitae tempor per id, has tota harum postea ut. At choro adversarium quo. Eos an dicit vidisse referrentur, dicant exerci utroque eu has. In has prima graeco adipisci.

This restaurant chain is changing the lives of struggling Cambodian kids

Posted on Mon, 22 Aug 2016

We chat with Friends International, a charity that's offering skills training for kids in Cambodia, Thailand, Laos and Indonesia...

Read more

This is what it looks like to eat your way through China (video)

Posted on Mon, 8 Aug 2016

If your experience of Chinese cuisine stops at a double order of fried rice and a side of sweet 'n' sour pork, you're not alone. Want to see what you're missing out on?

Read more

Why Japan does whisky bars better than anyone

Posted on Fri, 5 Aug 2016

We’re in Kyoto’s Gion district, and the Geisha Hour is about to begin. Time to look for a drink...

Read more

DAYS
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FROM
USD $1,332
CAD $1,615
AUD $1,895
EUR €1,230
GBP £965
NZD $2,035
ZAR R21,745
CHF FR1,360
Take a tour of Nepal and India from Kathmandu to Delhi. Visit the birthplace of Buddha at Lumbini, the ghats of...
DAYS
8
FROM
USD $1,152
CAD $1,255
AUD $1,495
EUR €1,035
GBP £765
NZD $1,595
ZAR R13,770
CHF FR1,060
Travel to Africa and visit Kenya, where an Intrepid wildlife safari awaits. From Nairobi, head to Lakes Nakuru and...

Kathmandu to Delhi , September 2016

Katie Scott

Kathmandu to Delhi , August 2016

helen tucker

Kathmandu to Delhi , July 2016

Jennifer van der Geest

Kathmandu to Delhi , July 2016

Marina Birk

Denali National Park

For a lot of travellers, Alaska tours begin and end with Denali. And it’s fair enough. People travel a long way to see a grizzly bear or a moose or an Alaskan wolf, and Denali National Park is odds-on their best chance. The coolest thing about Denali is that it doesn’t take days of hiking to see its highlights (although there’s still six million acres of untracked country to explore, if you’re keen) – you’ll be able to see epic wildlife right out the window as your trundle along the 92-mile unpaved Park Rd. Real adventure junkies should sign up for a scenic flight over the park (complete with glacier landing). 

Wrangell-St Elias National Park

Not to be outmuscled by its glitzy northern neighbor, Wrangell-St Elias is almost as spectacular as Denali, but with about a 10th of the tourists. We think that’s a pretty fair trade. And in terms of nature it’s no slouch. There’s 53,000 square miles of ice-frosted wilderness to whet your appetite; proper wilderness with glaciers bigger than Rhode Island and mountain peaks that have never felt a crampon. Sheltering in the trees below is a menagerie of bears, beavers, porcupines, moose and caribou. On our Alaska tours, we’ll set you up with a glacier walk and even a little ice climbing if you’re game (it’s like regular climbing, but colder).

Seward

Only Queenstown in New Zealand’s South Island could potentially rival Seward for its picturesque mountain setting: perched on the inky Resurrection Bay and crowded all around by jagged, snow-capped peaks. It marks Mile 0 of the famous Iditarod sled race, and in the gold rush days a trail was blazed from this little city deep into the Alaskan interior. It’s a refreshing change from the high mountain passes, with buzzing nightlife along the waterfront, boutique shopping and good restaurants in the charming old-downtown area. It’s also a shot hop from Kenai Fjords National Park, which makes it a popular launch-pad for kayakers, cruisers and whale watchers planning a trip to Alaska.

MacLaren River

Flowing down from the epic MacLaren Glacier, MacLaren River is one of those Alaskan secrets that’s beginning to get out. Mostly this is due to the excellent MacLaren River Lodge, a charming timber built accommodation with the approximate address of Miles From Anywhere. We’ll drive through the high alpine country to the Lodge, before continuing via canoe up the river to a remote ‘Glacier Camp’ where you’ll sleep out under the stars (but also under a tent and very warm sleeping bag). The general travel community is starting to get wind of MacLaren, but for the moment it remains a relatively unexplored gem. We’d love to keep it that way.  

Valdez

A cracking little adventure town, bordered on three sides by some of the highest coastal mountains in the world (topping 7000ft in some places). Valdez itself isn’t a work of art: it’s pretty flat and industrial as a rule, but it makes a fantastic gateway to Alaska’s best hiking and other outdoor activities. Because it’s the southern terminus of the famous Trans-Alaska Pipeline, there are also some interesting museums in town, documenting the frontier state’s history with black gold.  For us though, Valdez is all about the kayaking. We’ll get you into your own craft and help you paddle across inky fjords and past thundering waterfalls, flanked as always by those brooding icy peaks.

Denali National Park

For a lot of travellers, Alaska tours begin and end with Denali. And it’s fair enough. People travel a long way to see a grizzly bear or a moose or an Alaskan wolf, and Denali National Park is odds-on their best chance. The coolest thing about Denali is that it doesn’t take days of hiking to see its highlights (although there’s still six million acres of untracked country to explore, if you’re keen) – you’ll be able to see epic wildlife right out the window as your trundle along the 92-mile unpaved Park Rd. Real adventure junkies should sign up for a scenic flight over the park (complete with glacier landing). 

Wrangell-St Elias National Park

Not to be outmuscled by its glitzy northern neighbor, Wrangell-St Elias is almost as spectacular as Denali, but with about a 10th of the tourists. We think that’s a pretty fair trade. And in terms of nature it’s no slouch. There’s 53,000 square miles of ice-frosted wilderness to whet your appetite; proper wilderness with glaciers bigger than Rhode Island and mountain peaks that have never felt a crampon. Sheltering in the trees below is a menagerie of bears, beavers, porcupines, moose and caribou. On our Alaska tours, we’ll set you up with a glacier walk and even a little ice climbing if you’re game (it’s like regular climbing, but colder).

Seward

Only Queenstown in New Zealand’s South Island could potentially rival Seward for its picturesque mountain setting: perched on the inky Resurrection Bay and crowded all around by jagged, snow-capped peaks. It marks Mile 0 of the famous Iditarod sled race, and in the gold rush days a trail was blazed from this little city deep into the Alaskan interior. It’s a refreshing change from the high mountain passes, with buzzing nightlife along the waterfront, boutique shopping and good restaurants in the charming old-downtown area. It’s also a shot hop from Kenai Fjords National Park, which makes it a popular launch-pad for kayakers, cruisers and whale watchers planning a trip to Alaska.

MacLaren River

Flowing down from the epic MacLaren Glacier, MacLaren River is one of those Alaskan secrets that’s beginning to get out. Mostly this is due to the excellent MacLaren River Lodge, a charming timber built accommodation with the approximate address of Miles From Anywhere. We’ll drive through the high alpine country to the Lodge, before continuing via canoe up the river to a remote ‘Glacier Camp’ where you’ll sleep out under the stars (but also under a tent and very warm sleeping bag). The general travel community is starting to get wind of MacLaren, but for the moment it remains a relatively unexplored gem. We’d love to keep it that way.  

Valdez

A cracking little adventure town, bordered on three sides by some of the highest coastal mountains in the world (topping 7000ft in some places). Valdez itself isn’t a work of art: it’s pretty flat and industrial as a rule, but it makes a fantastic gateway to Alaska’s best hiking and other outdoor activities. Because it’s the southern terminus of the famous Trans-Alaska Pipeline, there are also some interesting museums in town, documenting the frontier state’s history with black gold.  For us though, Valdez is all about the kayaking. We’ll get you into your own craft and help you paddle across inky fjords and past thundering waterfalls, flanked as always by those brooding icy peaks.